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McNulty’s Testimony

Posted on by Jesse Lee

The Judiciary Committee is currently holding a hearing, “The Continuing Investigation into the U.S. Attorneys Controversy and Related Matters.” Former Deputy Attorney General Paul McNulty will testify. Read his opening remarks >>

Watch the hearing live via committee webcast or on C Span 3.

Chairwoman Linda T. Sánchez of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law gives opening remarks:

Chairwoman Sánchez:
“This hearing was called to help clear up some of these contradictions. Last month the Judiciary Committee heard from Monica Goodling, former senior counsel to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and the Department’s White House liaison. Ms. Goodling made specific allegations about the Deputy Attorney General including that he testified inaccurately before Congress and that he misled members of the Senate Judiciary Committee and a private briefing. I was particularly troubled when Ms. Goodling testified that a few minutes before the private Senate briefing was to take place, the Deputy made clear to her that he did not think she should attend…”

Rep. Hank Johnson (GA-04) questions McNulty on an order granting Monica Goodling and Kyle Sampson hiring and firing authority over his staff:

Rep. Johnson:
“Did it surprise you back in March when you first learned about it, that your authority to hire and fire within your own office had been taken away from you and given to a couple of inexperienced of political appointees?”

McNulty:
“What struck me was the guidance on the control sheet, if you will, that said this is to not be circulated through the office of the Deputy Attorney General, and I still don’t know to this day why that was the case.”

Rep. William Delahunt (MA-10) questions McNulty an apparent pattern of him being cut out of the loop:

Rep. Delahunt:
“I think you were poorly treated. I don’t think that the process was done in a way that reflected well in terms of the professionalism that I know exists in the Department of Justice. It’s my belief that you were thrown under the bus.”

Full Committee Chairman John Conyers questions McNulty on the issue of “caging,” a voter suppression technique:

Chairman Conyers:
“We’ve got a whole chain of testimony, this is one of the big issues that came out of at least a couple of major elections in this country, and you’re saying ‘yes, I was told about it, yes, it was in my tab in the briefing book for Senate testimony, and yes, I looked at the article but I didn’t read it’ — why does it not generate much concern or attention to you? For me, voter rights is one of the big problems we have in having it enforced in the Department of Justice.”

Rep. Zoe Lofgren questions McNulty about a controversial voter fraud indictment brought by Bradley Schlozman just days before an election, despite Justice Department guidelines advising against that:

McNulty:
“The people who were responsible for developing that policy and overseeing that policy are the public integrity section folks in the criminal division. And those same folks who establish that policy and police it were the ones that said that this did not violate that policy…”

Rep. Lofgren:
“Are you aware that Mr. Schlozman has now told the Senate that he wants to clarify that the public integrity section never directed or dadvised him on this case? … That’s what we’ve been told at least.”

Extended transcript of above exchange:

McNulty: “The people who were responsible for developing that policy and overseeing that policy are the public integrity section folks in the criminal division. And those same folks who establish that policy and police it were the ones that said that this did not violate that policy…”

Rep. Lofgren: “Are you aware that Mr. Schlozman has now told the Senate that he wants to clarify that the public integrity section never directed or dadvised him on this case? … That’s what we’ve been told at least.”

McNulty: “Right, well it’s a question of the word. I believe there’s some communication about using the word ‘directed’ versus seeking the advice…”

Rep. Lofgren: “It said ‘directed or advised’ is what he said.”

McNulty: “Well, advised there I think may also be a question of whether or not he was being prompted to or advised to do something proactively, as opposed to consulting and getting the input from that office, because I’m pretty confident that…”

Rep. Lofgren: “Well if I could, because that’s contradictory to what we’ve been told,and if we could follow up in writing on this I think that would be helpful…”

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